Conference Publication Details
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Carson, B.P.
In proceeding of: Proceedings of Sixth Physical Education, Physical Activity and Youth Sport (PE PAYS), At Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Limerick, Ireland
IDENTIFYING AND DEVELOPING THE TALENT OF THIRD LEVEL GAELIC FOOTBALLERS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LIMERICK.
2012
June
Published
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Abstract

 

This abstract aims to review the current talent development pathways for Gaelic footballers in a University of Limerick (UL) context, explore areas for improvement and make recommendations based on best practice. Third level competition represents an important opportunity in the development of Gaelic football talent. The standard of competition at this level is high as is the calibre of player. It must be acknowledged, however, that college football represents a small contribution to the player’s overall development when club and county commitments are considered. In UL at present, performance at trial games and previous performance at club, county and college level are the methods of talent identification and prediction of future performance utilised by coaching staff. These judgements can be subjective (Williams & Reilly, 2000) and rely on current performance rather than potential (Abbott et al., 2007). In addition to current methods, this author recommends a more scientific approach incorporating assessment of performance indicators including fundamental motor and technical skills, decision making processes, anthropometric and physiological testing. Overall performance is underpinned by five accepted ‘pillars’ which must be developed including physical, technical, tactical, mental and lifestyle to optimise performance. Currently, physical, technical and tactical aspects of performance are addressed on an ad hoc basis and little or no attention is given to the mental or lifestyle pillars. Future recommendations focus on formalising physical and lifestyle preparation via sport science student led interventions away from the team environment. Tactical, technical and psychological concepts should be firstly introduced and subsequently incorporated into each team session. No one ‘pillar’ of performance should receive priority unless dictated by a needs analysis as “talent development is holistic in nature due to the complex interaction of interdisciplinary issues that directly impact on athletic opportunity and progression” (Ford et al., 2011)

 

 

 

REFERENCES

 

Abbott, A., Collins, D., Sowerby, K. and Martindale, R. (2007) ‘Developing the Potential of Young People in Sport: A report for sport Scotland by The University of Edinburgh’, sportscotland: Edinburgh. ISBN: 978-1-850605-10-2.

Ford, P., De Ste Croix, M., Lloyd, R., Meyers, R., Moosavi, M., Oliver, J., Till, K.,Williams, C. (2011). The Long-Term Athlete Development model: Physiological evidence and application. Journal of Sports Sciences, 29, 389-402.

Williams, A.M., & Reilly, T. (2000). Talent identification and development. Journal of Sport Sciences, 18, 657-667.

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