Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Davies, RW;Carson, BP;Jakeman, PM
2018
October
Frontiers in physiology
Sex Differences in the Temporal Recovery of Neuromuscular Function Following Resistance Training in Resistance Trained Men and Women 18 to 35 Years
Published
10 ()
Optional Fields
HUMAN SKELETAL-MUSCLE STRENUOUS ECCENTRIC EXERCISE FIBER CHARACTERISTICS MAXIMAL CONTRACTIONS MENSTRUAL-CYCLE STRENGTH FATIGUE DAMAGE FATIGABILITY MECHANISMS
9
To investigate sex differences in the temporal recovery of neuromuscular function following resistance training (RT), eleven men and eight women 18-35 years completed a single RT bout (barbell back-squats, 80 % 1RM, 5 sets x 5 reps, 25 % duty cycle, then 1 set x max reps). Measures of muscle function (isometric, concentric, eccentric knee extensor strength, and countermovement jump (CMJ) height), serum creatine kinase activity (CK) and lower-body muscle pain were assessed before RT (0 h), +4 h, +24 h, +48 h, and +72 h post-RT. Data are mean % change from PRE (SD) and effect size (omega(2), d). Men and women had similar RT-experience (men, 2.1 (0.8) years vs. women 2.4 (1.0) years, P = 0.746, and d = 0.3) and 1RM strength per kg lean mass (men, 1.9 (0.2) kg.kg(-1) vs. women, 1.8 (0.3) kg.kg(-1), P = 0.303, and d = 0.3). A 36 (12)% increase in lower-body muscle pain was reported following RT (P < 0.05, d > 0.9). There was an absence of any overt change in CK [+24 h, 74 (41) 1U.L-1; pooled mean (SD)]. Decrements in knee extensor strength and CMJ height were observed +4 to +72 h for both men and women (P < 0.05, omega(2) = 0.19-0.69). Sex differences were apparent for CMJ height (+24 h men, -10 (6)% vs. women, -20 (11)%, P < 0.001, and d = 1.8) and isokinetic concentric strength (+24 h men, -10 (13)% vs. women -25 (14)%, P = 0.006, and d = 1.8), with a more pronounced loss and prolonged recovery in women compared to men (e.g., CMJ + 72 h men, -3 (6)% vs. women, -13 (12)%, P = 0.051, and d = 1.1). We conclude that the different temporal recovery patterns between men and women are not explicable by differences in muscle strength, RT performance, experience, muscle damage or fatigability.
LAUSANNE
1664-042X
10.3389/fphys.2018.01480
Grant Details